Why anyone can succeed at publishing, or why publishing is failing

Just an abstract scenario, because I don't want to get anyone (or myself) in trouble: Publisher owns print rights to backlist title. Publisher does not promote said title, resting on the title either selling well on its own or rotting. Publisher has first dibs at electronic rights, fumbles them with a bad offer. Other publisher … Continue reading Why anyone can succeed at publishing, or why publishing is failing

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Amazon.com: Tags Customers Associate with This Product

The “tags” that appear on Amazon product pages are user-generated tags and can be as helpful or spiteful as any user comment. Publishers and individual authors have no control over what tags customers associate with any given product. The best practice one can do, if one is so inclined, is to navigate to the “Tags … Continue reading Amazon.com: Tags Customers Associate with This Product

YM&S: Professional ambitions, part 1 – Publishers Lunch

Now that I've found a niche of publishing to call my very own, several professional ambitions have become defined in what was previously a very vague landscape. Planning things out before hand isn't really my style: one of the reasons that I fared so poorly in academia qua academia—I have habituated myself to solving any … Continue reading YM&S: Professional ambitions, part 1 – Publishers Lunch

Virgin Pulp

A new report has stated that children's publishers across the board are promoting Indonesian deforestation, and the children's market across all industries is unhappily tainted with reports of corner-cutting. Perhaps we wouldn't be surprised to hear that a children's book printed in China used that same ink mentioned in The Name of the Rose or a cheaper variant with the same implications. I suppose, all things considered, we're lucky the books aren't printed with lead ink!

A freelancer’s beginning

All I had to show for one year out of college in Texas was Starbucks and two freelancing gigs, one a failure and the other a success. My parents had kicked me out of their house. I couldn’t afford to move out of Steve’s parents’ house because my Starbucks wages only covered my credit card minimums, car payments, and student loans, not all of which had come out of their grace period yet. Unemployed, broke, and homeless with my dog in tow, I could’ve stayed.

Oh yeah, I talk about publishing, too

I forgot to mention in my purpose draft that I intend to use this blog to critique the publishing industry as well, particularly book publishers. My largest critique of today's book publishing industry (though it obviously applies to media across the board): Bumping up money on marketing and publicity while draining funds from editorial. A … Continue reading Oh yeah, I talk about publishing, too